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Jeffrey Sherman – “Strategic Commodities”

Teaser Tweets


Equities vs. Commodities Chart

Equities vs. Commodities Segment (00:48)


Prices vs. Recessions Chart

Commodities – Late Cycle (00:21)


To register for the upcoming “Strategic Commodities” webcast Tuesday, January 30, 2018 – please click here


The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an index of 505 stocks chosen for market size, liquidity and industry grouping, among other factors. The S&P 500 is designed to be a leading indicator of U.S. equities and is meant to reflect the risk/return characteristics of the large cap universe.

The Standard & Poor’s Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (S&P GSCI) Total Return Index in USD is widely recognized as the leading measure of general commodity price movements and inflation in the world economy. Index is calculated primarily on a world production weighted basis, comprised of the principal physical commodities futures contracts.

The Bloomberg Commodity Index (BCOM) is calculated on an excess return basis and reflects commodity futures price movements. The index rebalances annually weighted 2/3 by trading volume and 1/3 by world production and weight-caps are applied at the commodity, sector and group level for diversification. Roll period typically occurs from 6th-10th business day based on the roll schedule. One cannot invest directly in an index.

Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Index performance is not illustrative of fund performance. One cannot invest directly in an index. Please call 1.213,633.8200 for fund performance.

Mutual fund investing involves risk; Principal loss is possible. Investments in debt securities typically decrease when interest rates rise. This risk is usually greater for longer-term debt securities. Investments in commodities or commodity-linked derivative instruments may involve additional costs and risks such as changes in commodity index volatility or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments. Investing in derivatives could lose more than the amount invested. Investing in foreign securities involves political, economic, currency risks, greater volatility and differenced in accounting methods. These risks are greater for investments in emerging markets. Any index used by the Fund may not be widely used and information regarding its components and/or its methodology may not generally be known to industry participants, it may be more difficult for the Fund to find willing counterparties to engage in total or excess return swaps or other derivative instruments based on the return of the index. ETF and ETN investments involve additional risks such as the market price trading at a discount to its net asset value, an active secondary trading market may not develop or be maintained, or trading may be halted by the exchange in which they trade, which may impact a fund’s ability to sell its shares. The Fund may use leverage which may cause the effect of an increase or decrease in the value of the portfolio securities to be magnified and the fund to be more volatile than if leverage was not used. The Fund is non-diversified meaning it may concentrate its assets in fewer individual holdings than a diversified fund. Therefore, the Fund is more exposed to individual stock volatility than a diversified fund. The Fund may make short sales of securities, which involves the risk that losses may exceed the original amount invested.

 

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